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7 Foods You Should Never Eat

By Prevention Magazine

Published December 02, 2011

  • Glass of Milk

Food scientists are shedding light on items loaded with toxins and chemicals--and simple swaps for a cleaner diet and supersized health. 

Clean eating means choosing fruits, vegetables, and meats that are raised, grown, and sold with minimal processing. Often they're organic, and rarely (if ever) should they contain additives. But in some cases, the methods of today's food producers are neither clean nor sustainable. The result is damage to our health, the environment, or both. So we decided to take a fresh look at food through the eyes of the people who spend their lives uncovering what's safe--or not--to eat. We asked them a simple question: "What foods do you avoid?" Their answers don't necessarily make up a "banned foods" list. But reaching for the suggested alternatives might bring you better health--and peace of mind.

1. The Endocrinologist Won't Eat: Canned Tomatoes
Fredrick Vom Saal, is an endocrinologist at the University of Missouri who studies bisphenol-A.

The problem: The resin linings of tin cans contain bisphenol-A, a synthetic estrogen that has been linked to ailments ranging from reproductive problems to heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. Unfortunately, acidity (a prominent characteristic of tomatoes) causes BPA to leach into your food. Studies show that the BPA in most people's body exceeds the amount that suppresses sperm production or causes chromosomal damage to the eggs of animals. "You can get 50 mcg of BPA per liter out of a tomato can, and that's a level that is going to impact people, particularly the young," says vom Saal. "I won't go near canned tomatoes."

The solution: Choose tomatoes in glass bottles (which do not need resin linings), such as the brands Bionaturae and Coluccio. You can also get several types in Tetra Pak boxes, like Trader Joe's and Pomi.

Budget tip: If your recipe allows, substitute bottled pasta sauce for canned tomatoes. Look for pasta sauces with low sodium and few added ingredients, or you may have to adjust the recipe.

Pile Your Plate with These 25 Nutrition Superstars

2. The Farmer Won't Eat: Corn-Fed Beef
Joel Salatin is co-owner of Polyface Farms and author of half a dozen books on sustainable farming.

The problem: Cattle evolved to eat grass, not grains. But farmers today feed their animals corn and soybeans, which fatten up the animals faster for slaughter. But more money for cattle farmers (and lower prices at the grocery store) means a lot less nutrition for us. A recent comprehensive study conducted by the USDA and researchers from Clemson University found that compared with corn-fed beef, grass-fed beef is higher in beta-carotene, vitamin E, omega-3s, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), calcium, magnesium, and potassium; lower in inflammatory omega-6s; and lower in saturated fats that have been linked to heart disease. "We need to respect the fact that cows are herbivores, and that does not mean feeding them corn and chicken manure," says Salatin.

The solution: Buy grass-fed beef, which can be found at specialty grocers, farmers' markets, and nationally at Whole Foods. It's usually labeled because it demands a premium, but if you don't see it, ask your butcher.

Budget tip: Cuts on the bone are cheaper because processors charge extra for deboning. You can also buy direct from a local farmer, which can be as cheap as $5 per pound. To find a farmer near you, search eatwild.com.

20 Ways to Save At The Supermarket

3. The Toxicologist Won't Eat: Microwave Popcorn
Olga Naidenko, is a senior scientist for the Environmental Working Group.

The problem:
Chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), in the lining of the bag, are part of a class of compounds that may be linked to infertility in humans, according to a recent study from UCLA. In animal testing, the chemicals cause liver, testicular, and pancreatic cancer. Studies show that microwaving causes the chemicals to vaporize--and migrate into your popcorn. "They stay in your body for years and accumulate there," says Naidenko, which is why researchers worry that levels in humans could approach the amounts causing cancers in laboratory animals. DuPont and other manufacturers have promised to phase out PFOA by 2015 under a voluntary EPA plan, but millions of bags of popcorn will be sold between now and then.

The solution: Pop natural kernels the old-fashioned way: in a skillet. For flavorings, you can add real butter or dried seasonings, such as dillweed, vegetable flakes, or soup mix.

Budget tip: Popping your own popcorn is dirt cheap

Top 10 Food Mistakes Your Making

4. The Farm Director Won't Eat: Nonorganic Potatoes
Jeffrey Moyer is the chair of the National Organic Standards Board.

The problem:
Root vegetables absorb herbicides, pesticides, and fungicides that wind up in soil. In the case of potatoes--the nation's most popular vegetable--they're treated with fungicides during the growing season, then sprayed with herbicides to kill off the fibrous vines before harvesting. After they're dug up, the potatoes are treated yet again to prevent them from sprouting. "Try this experiment: Buy a conventional potato in a store, and try to get it to sprout. It won't," says Moyer, who is also farm director of the Rodale Institute (also owned by Rodale Inc., the publisher of Prevention). "I've talked with potato growers who say point-blank they would never eat the potatoes they sell. They have separate plots where they grow potatoes for themselves without all the chemicals."

The solution:
Buy organic potatoes. Washing isn't good enough if you're trying to remove chemicals that have been absorbed into the flesh.

Budget tip: Organic potatoes are only $1 to $2 a pound, slightly more expensive than conventional spuds.

What to Really Look for on a Nutrition Label

5. The Fisheries Expert Won't Eat: Farmed Salmon
Dr. David Carpenter, director of the Institute for Health and the Environment at the University at Albany, published a major study in the journal Science on contamination in fish.

The problem: Nature didn't intend for salmon to be crammed into pens and fed soy, poultry litter, and hydrolyzed chicken feathers. As a result, farmed salmon is lower in vitamin D and higher in contaminants, including carcinogens, PCBs, brominated flame retardants, and pesticides such as dioxin and DDT. According to Carpenter, the most contaminated fish come from Northern Europe, which can be found on American menus. "You could eat one of these salmon dinners every 5 months without increasing your risk of cancer," says Carpenter, whose 2004 fish contamination study got broad media attention. "It's that bad." Preliminary science has also linked DDT to diabetes and obesity, but some nutritionists believe the benefits of omega-3s outweigh the risks. There is also concern about the high level of antibiotics and pesticides used to treat these fish. When you eat farmed salmon, you get dosed with the same drugs and chemicals.

The solution: Switch to wild-caught Alaska salmon. If the package says fresh Atlantic, it's farmed. There are no commercial fisheries left for wild Atlantic salmon.

Budget tip:
Canned salmon, almost exclusively from wild catch, can be found for as little as $3 a can.

6. The Cancer Researcher Won't Drink: Milk Produced With Artificial Hormones
Rick North is project director of the Campaign for Safe Food at the Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility and former CEO of the Oregon division of the American Cancer Society.

The problem:
Milk producers treat their dairy cattle with recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH or rBST, as it is also known) to boost milk production. But rBGH also increases udder infections and even pus in the milk. It also leads to higher levels of a hormone called insulin-like growth factor in milk. In people, high levels of IGF-1 may contribute to breast, prostate, and colon cancers. "When the government approved rBGH, it was thought that IGF-1 from milk would be broken down in the human digestive tract," says North. As it turns out, the casein in milk protects most of it, according to several independent studies. "There's not 100 percent proof that this is increasing cancer in humans," admits North. "However, it's banned in most industrialized countries."

The solution: Check labels for rBGH-free, rBST-free, produced without artificial hormones, or organic milk. These phrases indicate rBGH-free products.

Budget tip: Try Wal-Mart's Great Value label, which does not use rBGH.

7. The Organic-Foods Expert Won't Eat: Conventional Apples
Mark Kastel, a former executive for agribusiness, is codirector of the Cornucopia Institute, a farm-policy research group that supports organic foods.

The problem: If fall fruits held a "most doused in pesticides contest," apples would win. Why? They are individually grafted (descended from a single tree) so that each variety maintains its distinctive flavor. As such, apples don't develop resistance to pests and are sprayed frequently. The industry maintains that these residues are not harmful. But Kastel counters that it's just common sense to minimize exposure by avoiding the most doused produce, like apples. "Farm workers have higher rates of many cancers," he says. And increasing numbers of studies are starting to link a higher body burden of pesticides (from all sources) with Parkinson's disease.

The solution: Buy organic apples.

Budget tip: If you can't afford organic, be sure to wash and peel them. But Kastel personally refuses to compromise. "I would rather see the trade-off being that I don't buy that expensive electronic gadget," he says. "Just a few of these decisions will accommodate an organic diet for a family."

8 "foods" that really are evil:



Following are eight foods to avoid or save for very special occasions because of the damage they inflict in calories, unhealthy fats and sodium -- plus some healthy and tasty substitutes that offer savings in calories and fat.


1. Cola drinks

The damage (12 ounces) 150 calories, 0 g fat (10 teaspoons of sugar!) We take a hard line with soft drinks -- and cola is the worst offender. Full of sugar, corn syrup or other sweeteners and not much else, soft drinks pack 150 empty calories and have been pegged by research studies as being associated with both adult and childhood obesity, Cola drinks have the added detriment of a caffeine jolt that many of us just don't need. And it's easy to supersize yourself if you regularly consume the 42-ounce, 410-calorie versions served at fast-food restaurants and convenience stores.

"I recommend that patients stay away from sugar-sweetened beverages because these drinks may be replacing more healthful foods in the diet," says Cara Ebbeling, Ph.D., research associate at Children's Hospital in Boston. "In addition, there is evidence that when we take in calories in liquid form, the body doesn't fully compensate by reducing calories from other foods." In other words, your body doesn't register that you've just consumed a bunch of calories, because you don't feel full. This may lead to overeating.

Finally, sipping cola and other soft drinks bathes your teeth in cavity-promoting sugars -- whose effects continue up to 40 minutes after your last sip.

Healthy alternative Fruit spritzers (12 ounces): 0-15 calories, 0 g fat Sugar-sweetened beverages are easy to replace. Add a spritz of your favorite juice to flavored seltzer water or diet tonic water. Another idea: Add a few drops of vanilla extract to plain seltzer (steer clear of club soda, which contains sodium). Or enjoy a can of your favorite flavor of diet soda or sugar-free iced tea or coffee. You save 135-150 calories, 0 grams fat


2. Sour cream and onion potato chips

The damage (12 chips) 150 calories, 10 g fat (3 g saturated), 210 mg sodium Can't believe you ate the whole bag? Join the club! Empty calories, fat and sodium deliver a triple whammy that is the downfall of many. To make things worse, manufacturers take potato abuse to a new low by adding sour cream and onion flavoring to chips -- complete with extra saturated and trans fats and a dash of MSG.

Healthy alternative Raw veggies with homemade yogurt dip (1/2 cup veggies with 1/4 cup dip): 72 calories, 0 g fat, 106 g sodium (Mix 1/4 cup plain nonfat yogurt with 1 teaspoon fresh or dried herbs like parsley or dill. Add minced garlic or onion for extra zip.) It's surprising how satisfying it can be to munch on carrot sticks dipped in a tangy yogurt sauce -- honest! You save 78 calories, log fat, 104 g sodium.


3. Store-bought chocolate chip cookies

The damage (1 small cookie) 80 calories, 4.5 g fat (1.5 g saturated) Commercial baked goods like snack cakes, cookies and crackers are the source of most of our trans fat intake. And ounce for ounce, chocolate chip cookies take the cake when it comes to excess fat and calories. Some products are worse than others: If the label lists sugar, hydrogenated oil, white flour or a bunch of chemicals that read like a Material Safety Data Sheet, you know this product has gone over to the Dark Side of the supermarket.

Healthy alternative Fig bars (1 small fig bar): 60 calories, 1 g fat Figs, like all dried fruit, can really hit the sweet spot. Fortunately, there are several brands that don't use hydrogenated oils. One to try: Newman's Own Organics Fig Newmans. Or make your own healthful cookies or muffins using whole-grain flour and canola oil. You save 20 calories, 3.5 g fat.


4. Full-fat cheeses

The damage (1 ounce) 120 calories, 9-10 g fat (6 g saturated) Cheese, butter and ice cream all contain saturated fat, which can lead to heart disease and other health problems. Full-fat cheeses can have as many as 10 grams of fat per ounce, with more than half of those grams saturated, but for some reason we tend to consider cheese a healthy choice. "Most people think of lasagna as a good food,' Liebman says. "But with all that cheese, it's loaded with saturated fat!"

Healthy alternative Low fat ricotta (1/4 cup): 60 calories, 3 q fat No need to eat full-fat cheese when there are so many other acceptable dairy products: lowfat and fatfree ricotta and cottage cheese, skim milk or even plain yogurt (add your own fruit). You save 60 calories, 6-7 g fat.


5. Chocolate doughnuts

The damage (1 doughnut) 300 calories, 19 g fat (6 g saturated) All doughnuts are high in trans fat, sugar and calories. And although "bad doughnuts' may seem redundant, the chocolate-covered varieties cross the line into evil. Supermarket versions are the worst, at 19 grams of fat per doughnut, with doughnut-shop varieties a close second at about 16 grams.

Healthy alternative Raisin toast with peanut butter (1 slice raisin toast and 1 tablespoon reduced-fat peanut butter): 166 calories, 7 g fat (1.5 g saturated) You save 134 calories, 13 g fat (4.5 g saturated).


6. Regular bacon

The damage (2 slices, cooked and drained) 120 calories, 10 q fat (3 g saturated) Pigging out on bacon -- basically fried fat and salt -- can lead to more than expanding thighs. Cured meats like bacon, corned beef, ham and pastrami contain preservatives called nitrates that have been linked to stomach and colon cancers.

Healthy alternative Vegetarian sausage (2 links, cooked and drained): 80 calories, 3 g fat (0.5 g saturated) Instead of bringing home the bacon, why not fry up some veggie links? Morningstar Farms makes delicious vegetarian alternatives to pork and beef sausage. Turkey bacon is also a much healthier choice than pork. You save 40 calories, 7g fat (2.5 g saturated).


7. Beef hot dogs

The damage (1 hot dog without bun) 180 calories, 16 q fat (7 g saturated), 550 mg sodium Hot dogs can make a cookout more fun, but when it comes to nutritional value, they bite! The original "mystery meat," almost all of these dirty dogs are loaded with fat -- not to mention pig and cow parts that are unusable in other meat products, plus sodium and nitrates. As a red meat, hot dogs also may increase cancer risk. And beef is a source of trans fat because cows hydrogenate fat in their stomachs.

Healthy alternative Ball Park turkey hot dog (1 turkey dog without bun): 45 calories, O g fat, 420mg sodium Ball Park Turkey Franks are unusually low in calories and sodium. Or try Applegate Farms, which has no nitrates or antibiotics. You save 135 calories, 16 q (at (7 g saturated), 130 trig sodium.


8. Chocolate truffles

The damage (I truffle) 220 calories, 13 q fat (11 q saturated) This one might be a "duh," but it is alarming just how much sugar we consume each year in the form of candy -- according to government statistics, 23 pounds per person, or the equivalent of 184 candy bars. Chocolate truffles, for example, contain highly saturated palm or coconut oils -- making them among the worst culprits in the candy department.

Healthy alternative Chocolate-covered strawberries (4 strawberries dunked in 1/4 cup lite chocolate syrup: 114 calories, O g fat; or Haagen-Dazs Chocolate Sorbet Bar: 80 calories, O g fat) When that sweet tooth beckons, try nature's candy: fruit. Strawberries will give you sweetness and crunch and save your waistline, while the syrup will satisfy your craving for chocolate. When only chocolate will do, a Haagen-Dazs Chocolate Sorbet Bar is guaranteed to satisfy your sweet tooth. You save 106 calories, 13 q fat (11 g saturated) with the chocolate-covered strawberries, and 140 calories and 13 q fat with the Haagen-Dazs Chocolate Sorbet Bar


Candace Combe, M.S., R.D., L.D.N., is a nutrition consultant at The Mind/Body Medical Institute in Chestnut Hill, Mass., and a freelance writer.

COPYRIGHT 2003 Weider Publications
COPYRIGHT 2003 Gale Group

Click here to read the entire article by Dr. Mercola 

Tips for Keeping MSG Out of Your Diet, by Dr. Mecola

In general, if a food is processed you can assume it contains MSG (or one of its pseudo-ingredients). So if you stick to a whole, fresh foods diet, you can pretty much guarantee that you’ll avoid this toxin.

The other place where you’ll need to watch out for MSG is in restaurants. You can ask your server which menu items are MSG-free, and request that no MSG be added to your meal, but of course the only place where you can be entirely sure of what’s added to your food is in your own kitchen.

To be on the safe side, you should also know what ingredients to watch out for on packaged foods. Here is a list of ingredients that ALWAYS contain MSG:


Autolyzed Yeast

Calcium Caseinate

Gelatin

Glutamate

Glutamic Acid

Hydrolyzed Protein

Monopotassium Glutamate

Monosodium Glutamate

Sodium Caseinate

Texured Protein

Yeast Extract

Yeast Food

Yeast Nutrient


These ingredients OFTEN contain MSG or create MSG during
processing


Flavors and Flavorings
Natural Chicken Flavoring
Stock
Anything Enzyme Modified
Protease
Seasonings
Soy sauce
Broth
Carrageenan
Corn Starch
Natural Flavors and Flavorings
Soy Protein Isolate
]Malt Extract
Malodextrin
Citric Acid
Natural Pork Flavoring
Soy Protein
Malt Flavoring
Pectin
Powdered Milk
Natural Beef Flavoring
Bouillion
Barley Malt
Enzymes
Anything Protein Fortified
Anything Ultra-Pasteurized



  
       

These ingredients OFTEN contain MSG or create MSG during processing:[10]

 

So if you do eat processed foods, please remember to be on the lookout for these many hidden names for MSG.

Choosing to be MSG-Free

Making a decision to avoid MSG in your diet as much as possible is a wise choice for nearly everyone. Admittedly, it does take a bit more planning and time in the kitchen to prepare food at home, using fresh, locally grown ingredients. But knowing that your food is pure and free of toxic additives like MSG will make it well worth it.

Plus, choosing whole foods will ultimately give you better flavor and more health value than any MSG-laden processed food you could buy at your supermarket.


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Six different healthy choices that you have the power to make. 

Sunset Chiropractic - Dr. Thomas Maurno

1- Mainetance Chiropractic visits once per month to maximize function and maintain proper alignment.

2- Three simple but powerful dietary choices- A-Don’t eat anything white (no white bread, sugar. or rice) B-Target foods of color (equals more antioxidants) C- Only eat foods that will spoil in a few days ( no preservatives)

3- Drink enough Water- one 8 oz glass for every 20 lbs of body weight. (160 lbs= 8 8oz glasses or 64oz). One 8oz glass for every 15 minutes of exercise or heat exposure. One eight oz glass for every serving of alcohol or caffeine. Drink up, water is an essential nutrient.

4-Daily Supplementation of essential nutrients-1- High quality multi-vitamin/mineral , 2-Essential fatty acids/fish oils, and 3- an anti -oxidant supplent such as the greens we carry in the office. By supplementing these three items you insure that your body is getting everything it needs to be healthy and function optimally.

5-Exercise- For good cardiovascular health we recommend at least thirty minutes of walking, biking, or swimming at least 4 days per week. In addition to promote good posture, better alignment and increased brain activity, we recommend at least twice a week participation in a core stability program ( ask our office for handouts and advice), or pilates, or yoga or any other discipline that works your balance and core stability muscles.

6- Mental health- scheduled “ME” time. Everyone needs this too. At least 2-3 times per week schedule at least 20-30 minutes for meditation, art, music, books, or anything else that is calming and relaxing to you. This will help create balance in your world, and fight against stress.

WARNING! Only take this advice if you want to Look better, Feel Better, Be Happier, Live Longer, And Enjoy Life More. 

Dr. Tom Maurno and the staff of Sunset Chiropractic 

Sunset Chiropractic - Dr. Thomas Maurno
South Miami Florida chiropractor chiropractors
7575 SW 62nd Avenue Suite A - South Miami, Florida 33143
Tel: (305) 666-4449 - Fax:
Office Hours - call for appointment times
web: http://www.sunsetchiropractic.com

email: sunsetchiro33@bellsouth.net

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